News

2018.01.26 | Research news

Science paper on the Nature of Nurture

Bjarni Vilhjalmsson from BiRC has contributed to a new paper in Science that shows how parental genotypes affect the phenotypes of the children, even those genes that are not transmitted. Read the paper here http://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6374/424 or a feature on it by Carl Zimmer at New York Times

cover suggestion for Nature article (Illustration: Astrid Reitzel)

2018.01.05 | Research news

Danish pan genome paper pronounced most significant Danish research 2017 by videnskab.dk

The readers of videnskab.dk has voted the Danish pan genome study to be the most significant Danish research result in 2017. The main project, published in Nature July 2017 (https://www.nature.com/articles/nature23264), is a major Danish collaboration where researchers from BiRC played a very central part. The assembly and analysis of the 150…

Photo: Shutterstock

2017.10.10 | Research news

The mapping of the shared Danish genome

Danish researchers from three universities have analysed the genomes of fifty families and created access to very precise knowledge about how the genome of a healthy, average Dane looks. The new knowledge is called the Danish Reference Genome and it can increase our understanding of hereditary diseases and support the development of personalised…

2017.09.29 | Research news

A new way of comparing illegal cocaine samples.

Researchers from BiRC and Institute of Forensic Medicine have developed a model that can be trained to correctly classify illegal cocaine seizures. The new method is a major improvement over existing methods and is the result of an ongoing collaboration between BiRC and the Dept of Forensic Chemistry. Other articles from the collaboration:…

2017.09.29 | Research news

New knowledge of the immune system

Researchers from BiRC has assembled 100 new MHC haplotypes. Before this new landmark only 8 complete haplotypes were described. Abstract: Genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, also known as HLA) play a critical role in the immune response and variation within the extended 4 Mb region shows association with major risks of many…

Figure: Ditlev E. Brodersen.

2016.12.21 | Nature and technology

Researchers reveal the secret code language of bacteria

Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global challenge. Danish researchers have now discovered that bacteria use a code language to avoid being controlled. Understanding this code language will be paramount to developing new antibiotics in the future.

2016.04.27 | Research news

Slow worms react quickly to climate change

Evolution can go quickly when it has to – at least for small organisms. Researchers exposed a natural setting in Denmark to artificial climate change and discovered that soil just half a degree warmer caused the genome of small worms to change surprisingly quickly.

2016.04.01 | Research news

Model can be trained to guess your height

Postdoc Bjarni Vilhjálmsson and Aarhus University researchers have developed a probability model that can be trained to calculate the impact of genetic variants on our appearance and diseases. Providing accurate indications of our genomes is still a long way off.

The Genome DK HPC HUB supercomputer at Aarhus University was used for a considerable part of the data processing in connection with mapping the Danish genome. Professor Anders Børglum, Department of Biomedicine (right), is seen here with Professor Mikkel Heide Schierup, Bioinformatics Research Centre (BiRC). Photo: Aarhus University

2015.01.21 | Research news

Making it easier to see the difference between defective and healthy genes in Denmark

It will be easier to diagnose genetically determined diseases in Denmark now that researchers at Aarhus University, the University of Copenhagen and the Technical University of Denmark have mapped the first full individual genomes of 30 out of 150 ordinary Danes.

2013.10.28 | Research news

Students and researchers will map the Danish genes

A new project collaboration involving 800 high school students will try to solve where the Danish genes come from - and for the first time ever write the genetic history of the Danish population.

Showing results 1 to 10 of 22

1 2 3 Next